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Australian politicians plea for deportation of Sukumaran, Chan

 

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0080003738403px; line-height: 1.538em;”>Read the full letter and the complete list of signatories below.

Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan have spent more than 10 years in Kerobokan prison, where they are facing execution for the crime of drug trafficking.

Australian politicians have written to the Indonesian Ambassador to Australia Nadjib Riphat Kesoema to appeal for Mr Sukumaran and Mr Chan to be deported.

The 111 politicians from a range of parties said that they believe the pair should be punished, but noted that Australia had abolished the death penalty.

“We request that their death sentences be commuted to an appropriate term of imprisonment or that they be deported back to Australia on condition they face the criminal justice system here,” they said.

The correspondence – led by Philip Ruddock, Chris Hayes, Craig Laundy, Melissa Parke, Brett Mason and Warren Snowdon – emphasised the relationship between the two countries, including the ties between Indonesian and Australian Federal Police.

‘We request that their death sentences be commuted to an appropriate term of imprisonment or that they be deported back to Australia’

They further pressed the Ambassador on the “genuine remorse” and rehabilitation shown by Mr Sukumaran and Mr Chan.

“By reason of their good behaviour, demonstrated rehabilitation and education of other prisoners, both Mr Chan and Mr Sukumaran come within the Constitutional Court’s recommendation,” they said.

“Also, we believe it is significant that both Mr Chan and Mr Sukumaran were only apprehended as a result of the Australian Federal Police providing information to Indonesian Police. Their crime, serious as it was, was intended to impact on Australians in Australia, not Indonesia.”

Their correspondence, dated February 6, coincides with a push from the Australians’ lawyers to challenge the presidential decree that denied clemency.

Lawyer Todung Mulya Lubis, said it was “unfair, unjust and unacceptable” that individual cases weren’t judged on their merits.

“This is probably the only legal recourse left for us at the moment,” he said.

The challenge would be filed this week and a letter sent to inform the attorney-general, who is planning the next executions.